SHARE

My Op Ed today is going to borrow heavily from Motor Sport Magazine’s Rob Widdows. Firstly, because while I do not know Rob personally, I enjoy his work immensely and the magazine in which he plies his craft. Secondly, because I wholeheartedly agree with his call for Knighthood for a legend in motor sport.

Mr. Widdows aptly posits the question…why has Mr. John Surtees not been offered a Knighthood? I can think of no better man to receive this award in motor sport and I applaud Mr. Widdows for his temerity in calling for the British Government to bestow the motorcycle champion and formula One champion with this honor. Few men have accomplished what Mr. Surtees has and if the honor of Knighthood is to recognize the efforts and accomplishments that a citizen of the British Empire (I use the term “empire” loosely here) has achieved, then the time has come and past for this to happen for Mr. Surtees.

You can read Mr. Widdows plaintive here.

Mr. Widdows also takes time to mention Stuart Codling’s new book, Real Racers, and while I have not acquired a copy yet, we did review his previous book, Art of the Formula One Race Car and it was terrific. We also, like Widdows, recommend Stuart’s work and he’s a nice enough gentleman to follow F1B as well so let’s show Stuart some reciprocal love and check him out.

SHARE
An F1 fan since 1972, NC has spent over 25 years in the technology industry and as a CTO, he focuses on technology integration in commercial workspace design, AV systems integration, digital media strategies, technology planning, consulting, speaking, presenting, sales, content strategy, marketing and brand building.
  • Jack Flash (Aust)

    Royal Honours or not – I think it is probably more up-to-date to substitute the term “Empire” for “Commonwealth”. Empire is a very dated term, that I guess many in the ‘UK establishment’ still cling onto. Britain hasn’t really had an Empire for quite a while now (since most of her greater colonies have become independent and self-governing countries themselves long ago).
    Case example: The Commonwealth Games used to be called the Empire Games. That terminology changed in the 1930’s or 1940’s I think.
    ———————-
    So YES, the term “Empire” is sort of an in-joke to Aussies and Canadians and South Africans New Zealanders and Indians and the rest of the Monarchial Commonwealth clan.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_members_of_the_Commonwealth_of_Nations JF

  • BillFenner1967

    Oh, who gives a shit if he’s knighted or (k)not?! Such ‘honours’ are all a load of bollocks anyway.

    Surtees is a legend, full stop. He doesn’t need old Liz to smack him with a ceremonial sword to confirm that.

    • Formula1Mad

      +1

  • SMB

    1) I agree with Jack Flash that, at least here in Britain, nobody uses the term “Empire”.

    2) It would be sir John not sir Surtees.

    3) @ BillFenner1967 Honours are a great way of recognising people who have made significant contributions during their lifetime. I have no idea why you would have such animosity towards them.

    4) Most importantly, it’s certainly time for John Surtees to be knighted!

    • BillFenner1967

      Why the animosity? Well, how about because it’s inherently classist and reinforces the monarchial power structure, which, in itself, is anti-democratic and anti-humanist. To go along with this tripe is to give one’s tacit approval to a tradition that is well past its used by date and deserves to pass into extinction. The honours system is really more about handing out more awards to celebrities than anything.

      Take a leaf from the great Keith Richards and, if offered, tell them to shove it, Mr Surtees!

  • Graaaaaaace! Todd’s on Peter Windsor’s hobby horse again!