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Join Paul and me as we review the Monaco Grand Prix. We cover each team as they finished, discuss the action on track and even discuss Ferrari’s strategy/team orders. 

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An F1 fan since 1972, NC has spent over 25 years in the technology industry focusing on technology integration, AV systems integration, digital media strategies, technology planning, consulting, speaking, presenting, sales, content strategy, marketing and brand building.
  • JasonSCarter

    Paul, I’ll buy you a beer if you just agree with Todd that Kimi was just to slow….

    • The international

      Ill buy my own beer then. There have been countless races where the leader has not shown their true pace because they didn’t have to Hamilton Rosberg and yes even Vettel , I feel Kimi was driving under full potential because it was the right thing to do, if you don’t have to extend yourself at Monaco you don’t, and you certainly don’t pit first when in the lead. Is Vettel a faster driver, yes but theres a lot of faster drivers that don’t win the race.

      • peter riva

        You are absolutely right. Friends in Monaco overheard Hobbs telling his dinner party it was obvious, Ferrari orchestrated Vettel taking the lead as Kimi’s tires were at the point of returning to form AS EXPECTED.

        • And if I were Maurizio, I would have done the same thing as Vettel is leading title and you have Lewis on the ropes.

          • peter riva

            Well, of course that’s a team decision –
            But hold on – isn’t it alwasy you and ALL the commentators who say Ferrari’s goal is to win the championship NOT make a driver a champion?
            Hiding of that decision to favor Vettel is (to say the least) awkward.
            And on another hand, the disloyalty to Kimi may cost Ferrari the championship if they lose his trust. AND in putting him into traffic they were lucky he finished second.

          • Ferrari are in it for Ferrari and if keeping a 4-time champ in Vettel means working with him to win the title, I think they’ll do it. I’m not trying to be terse here but Kimi knows his role in the team and I think he’s probably happy to have had an 1-year extension. If you feel that he’s out at the end of the year for Ricciardo or Perez, then his mind may already be as a short-timer. Ferrari will have to manage either scenario but Seb has shown he can win without the help of a teammate…think Webber and Red Bull. What Ferrari may not be able to do is win the constructors without both drivers in it so it is a risk.

          • peter riva

            No doubt you are 100% right here… especially the last sentence.Okay, so I’m a Kimi fan and hated not to see him win, but I am also a Ferrari fan and the risk they took, dropping him into traffic and messing with his head for the rest of the season may prove an error. With Hamilton (at the time) so far behind, they could have played safe… let Kimi win, over or undercut be damned.

          • Zachary Noepe

            Agreed. I think the whole thing’s pretty obvious, all they did is give Vettel the chance to win it with his speed, and it’s weird for everyone particularly Merc to get wound up about it since they use Bottas as a moving chicane to win races for Hamilton.

            And I think the only reason there IS so much talk about it frankly is there’s nothing else to talk about from a racing point of view because there’s no race in Monaco, just a flashy parade.
            Show me a race where one tiny decision dominates all post race coverage, and I’ll show you a lousy race.

      • I understand this point but from what Ferrari were suggesting, Kimi was slow enough to put Vettel in danger and split the one.two finish. If that was the case, I would make the same call they did.

  • Prakhar Mehrotra

    I agree with Todd. I think Vettel would have won the race if he pitted before or after. He was just faster than Kimi around the time of the pit stops. Before stopping, Kimi asked his engineers “Are we stopping yet?” That, combined with his lack of pace suggests he was struggling with tires and Ferrari were concerned that he would be jumped. Vettel went 1.5 seconds per lap faster and from what I have read, no one saw that coming. I can believe that Kimi was going slowly to preserve tire life and engine, but not by 1.5 seconds per lap. Either way we will never know.

    I just hope that this doesn’t demoralize Kimi as Ferrari and Vettel will need him to take points away from Hamilton. Hopefully he walks away with the fact that he out qualified Vettel in Monaco.

  • Meine Postma

    On Motorsport they really get into the Ferrari/Kimi/Vettel discussion with a lot of great insights from Mark Hughes in the comments section.
    Great read!

    http://www.motorsportmagazine.com/reports/f1/2017-monaco-grand-prix-report

    • peter riva

      And there it is: “Ferrari had knowingly brought Räikkönen in on a lap where it was certain he’d encounter lapped traffic.”

    • Mark is terrific. I’ve met him and he’s a really nice guy but as I said, there wasn’t much talk ahead of the race about everyone knowing it was the overcut that would work best. That said, Mark is probably referring to the team strategists and not general public.

  • Schumi Toronto

    Hey Todd,

    Captain “Wild” Bill Wichrowski is not the captain of the Cape Caution – he’s the proud new owner of “Summer Bay”, which he bought in hopes of his deadbeat son taking over, when he retires.

    http://www.monstersandcritics.com/smallscreen/deadliest-catch-exclusive-huge-wave-slams-summer-bay-as-biggest-storm-of-season-hits/

    As for the race, I just can’t believe all of the talk about Ferrari switching lead drivers! What’s the big deal? I don’t think they orchestrated it and even if they did, it’s not like it’s illegal, it’s not like it’s never been done before and why wouldn’t they back Seb? WTF???

    • Ah, well last I saw, it was the Caution. Good for him. :)

  • SurveyorTom

    Fantastic Podcast, Guys. You managed to capture the essence of this race, which was like a barbell (dumbell?) with a few brilliant performances and a whole crap-load of godawful ones, with only a few somewhere in the middle.

    I guess Bernd Maylander learned the hard way not to F with the Swede!

  • SurveyorTom

    Thanks for the coverage of the Alonso@Indy story. Who knows what next year holds, but was it not overwhelmingly apparent that he was have a good time???

    To me, he had the appearance of falling in love again. I wonder if that was my imagination or just wishful thinking. God knows after the last two years (or seven) of dragging various sleds up the finishing order way ahead of where they had any right to be, he has earned a few weeks of enjoyment and satisfaction. I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again, if Andretti can get him in an Indy car at Road America, he might never go back to F1.

    • When I saw him, he looked to be in great spirits and having a good time. Very determined though…he’s a pro.