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Apparently Robert Kubica has offered his impression of Lewis Hamilton’s driving and has labeled him as dangerous. While being critical of Ron’s shining star is not allowed if F1, Ron, relatively uncharacteristically has launched into a defense on Lewis’s behalf while Lewis says he does his talking on the track…if only that were true Lewis. You do your talking ont he track, off the track and all around the track.

By Alastair Himmer

FUJI, Japan (Reuters) – McLaren team boss Ron Dennis Saturday slammed suggestions that Formula One championship leader Lewis Hamilton was a dangerous driver.

BMW-Sauber driver Robert Kubica was reported in newspapers to have called Hamilton “too aggressive,” with the Pole saying he hoped Ferrari’s Felipe Massa won the world title instead.

“I think he (Kubica) should focus on his own driving,” Dennis said after Hamilton was fastest in qualifying for Sunday’s Japanese Grand Prix, his sixth pole of the year and the 12th of his short career.

“He should leave that to those people whose responsibility it is to determine how good or bad a driver’s performance is. There is obviously a regulatory process in place.

“I share the view held by probably everyone in this room and most of the people down the pitlane that it is refreshing to have a highly talented driver that has the ability to overtake and to do the pole positions he’s done in what is only his second season in Formula One.”

Kubica was quoted as saying Hamilton should have been penalised for reckless driving at last month’s Italian Grand Prix when he charged from 15th on the grid to finish seventh.

The Polish driver, a long-time friend and rival of Hamilton’s from their karting days, reportedly accused the McLaren man of cutting across Toyota’s Timo Glock and Renault’s Fernando Alonso in Monza.

Hamilton, who takes a seven-point lead over Brazilian Massa into the race at Fuji, refused to get drawn into an argument.

“I do my talking on the track,” he said. “I haven’t really got much to say to it. I think everyone has their own opinion and I can respect that.”

Dennis was less circumspect, however, telling Kubica to mind his own business. The Pole trails Hamilton by 20 points with only three races remaining.

“He should be mindful of the fact that his objective should be to raise his own game and do the best job he can,” said Dennis. “He should keep those opinions to himself.”

(Editing by Alan Baldwin)

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An F1 fan since 1972, NC has spent over 25 years in the technology industry and as a CTO, he focuses on technology integration in commercial workspace design, AV systems integration, digital media strategies, technology planning, consulting, speaking, presenting, sales, content strategy, marketing and brand building.
  • Jim

    He has shown a certain disregard for others on the track on more than one occasion. I give Kubica credit for stating his opiinon publicly and being willing to take the heat for picking on LewHam

  • Christopher

    I agree with Kubica, and feel that he has every right to express his opinion. I am growing weary of the righteousness of “Saint Lewis” and his McLaren handlers. I was excited when he first joined F1, but now I am just sick of him. I wish that more drivers and teams would be able to express themselves about things going on in F1. It has become too much a business and political machine, and less and less of a sport.

    • Sumamakji

      I just find you incompitent and weak white people incapable of any form of true compitition, and to duch an extent which makes me feel sorry for you

  • Ron comes off a little over defensive here. Robert has every right to suggest that Hamilton is ‘aggressive’ as most know that Lewis is. That, depending on who you are, is not really a bad thing but does comprise the totality of Lewis’s style. He’s been aggressive with other drivers and with the car but I actually like that in a driver.

    Ron may suggest that Robert needs to concern himself with his own issues and Robert is doing that just fine. Pace-corrected, Robert may just give Lewis all he wants. There is an element of truth in Roberts statements that Lewis is over doing it for a 2nd year driver. Robert is a second year driver and wrestled an inferior BMW into Q3. I think Robert is just suggesting that Lewis is too aggressive with other drivers and with tires and that could be his undoing. That’s purely opinion and while Ron may take offense, Lewis has said far worse about his competition.

  • Noddy93

    for once Lewis gave a good answer.

  • onthepodium

    again, more whining about nothing. kubica has his opinion, which as another competitor of lewis, is valid as his own opinion. lewis’ comment was: “I haven’t really got much to say to it. I think everyone has their own opinion and I can respect that.” sounds good to me. until lewis actually does something over-the-top dangerous and justifies some kind of punitive action, it’s all racing. if kubica were in the same spot points-wise, i bet he may be “aggressive” too. hmm, wasn’t that schumacher guy aggressive? or wait, he’s a saint too.

  • T4

    Thats how media work. If there is no news – create them.
    All movies nowadays have more and more blood , sex and killings. The more the better. Media do same thing now. Making news about nothing and helping people to get pissed off at each other. Creating anger and than lies become “truth” and there is a lot of real news out of nothing. When you are angry you tend to be out of full control and start saying things you wouldn’t otherwise.
    They just want you to say smthng unusual and go thrugh it 100 times. Remember what McLaren boss said about Kubica’s nose? People say things and not necessary that they want it in “news” next morning

  • There certainly is an element of that T4. It seems that media as a whole has reduced itself to a sort of masturbatory relief from the listlessness that currently exists. It has divorced the reasons it existed as an ends to a means and become, like all moving pictures, entertainment.

    Once great institutions of journalism have been reduced to nothing more than gossip rags whose margins are best suited for advertising rather than taking notes upon the revelations that the body or content has provoked. There is a story here regarding Lewis and Robert but it is not what we have read.

    One is not presented the story in which to form an opinion upon; rather one is given an opinion with the story as the coagulant. I rather prefer the former as I am capable of making my own decisions when presented the facts. But that’s just my preference, I am sure there are millions who enjoy the sublime and nuance that comes with editorial in sheep’s clothing.

  • FFC

    Talk about gossip rags, look how you started off this report NC! Criticism of Lewis isn’t allowed, huh? Then how come every F1 forum I’ve visited, it’s all there is to read?

    I’ll keep paying attention to race results, and leave the girlie gossip crap for fans who desperately need something to explain why their team or driver isn’t doing the job. Hell, if Kimi was seven points ahead of Lewis, this article wouldn’t even have been published.

  • warpo

    “hmm, wasn’t that schumacher guy aggressive?”

    Yeah, he would have shown already to Lewis what contact against a wall feels like and Lewis would think it twice the next time he’d like to pull that one onto someone else.

    Too bad Schumi’s gone.

    • Sumamakji

      The problem with that is: shui was’nt fast enought to catch Lewis, and in any case it’s realy hard being able to see through exhaust smoke.
      To be tryly superior you need to do it in deeds not self praise

  • FFC

    Yeah warpo, Schumi would’ve, could’ve and should’ve done this, that and the other and Lewis wouldn’t ever have won a single race and blah, blah, blah…
    I’m about to start lamenting the fact Fangio’s gone any day now.

    Schumi didn’t show Alonso crap, so how does it follow he’d have shown Lewis anything? Or did you, like most Schumi fans, erase those 05 and 06 from your memory? Let’s stop trying to explain away the present by turning to the past, tifosi.

  • FFC, you certainly understand that F1B is an opinion/editorial site? Not a news site.

  • Linda Nielsen

    Well I have to agree with NC, since the beginning of the year we have heard how Lewis is dating a pussycat, how Lewis carries luggage through LAX, how Kimi drinks to much and cheats on his wife, what drivers are going to what teams, how Kimi is going to retiring, and many more runny mouth comments. Dear god the gossip is worse than it was when I was in high school. If they would report on F1, drivers and events that happen related to F1 then maybe all the fans can get the correct news and voice there opinions correctly. That would be nice, but that is like wishing that Bernie and Max would retire not going to happen antime soon.

  • Srehman

    I guess Kubica was right. Or have the Lewis sycophants suddenly stopped paying attention to race results? Lewis has a clear choice: he can continue to remain a “pure racer”, doing stupidly aggressive moves in a bid to win the race on the first corner, and end up like JePeM, or he can learn to drive strategically and smartly, and win some WDCs.

    Let me put it this way: put Alonso or Schumi in the best car in the field, 7 points ahead, 3 races to go, would you be betting against them? I didn’t think so.

  • David

    There appears to be double standards being applied by the stewards to most GTs I have watched recently. If you watch the replay of the start of the Japan GT it is obvious that Hamilton did drive agressively, but anyone who overtakes during a GT is driving agressively. I cannot see how he “forced” Raikkonen wide when they both kept the same line into the corner with Hamilton outbraking the Ferrari and leading into the corner. It is Kovalainen who comes a lot closer during the turn, then Raikkonen appears to miss a gear change and drops back and almost collects Massa. I recall that Massa did the same manoeuvre a few races back with all wheels smoking as this time, but noone said a dicky-boo, he was lauded for that and I do not recall Kubica calling Massa dangerous.

    Kubic’s remarks sound like Polish sour grapes to me.

  • To add a little spice to your position David, let’s not forget that Kubica and Fernando have become good friends. Poker buddies in fact. They were talking the entire time on the podium during the anthems and seem to get along very well.

    In the end, it seems another grand prix where the stewards have become the focal point or controversy overshadowing the race. Bottom line is, Lewis fell short and Massa didn’t really capitalize while Fred drove a terrific race.

  • mark h

    I feel that where Monza’s concerned Bobbie K probably has a point… Not sure that turn one was a ‘dangerous’ move today. Mind you, it was certainly a very, very foolish one. I’d still like Lewis to win this thing, but he seems determined to drive like a moron when it matters again.

  • matt

    So Hamilton is supposed to be dangerous. This is absloute crap all the best drivers of history muscle there way through the field its just racing. What should be concentrated on is the fact that the FIA and stewards are doing everything in their power to make sure a ferrari driver wins the title. If Hamilton did need a penalty then a drive through was the right decision. But giving Massa the same penalty for a manouver that was far more dangerous and desperate was ablsoute rubbish. He should have had a 10 sec stop go at the very least if not black flagged. That move could have pushed both cars into everyone taking out over half the field, it was only the skill of all the drivers at the back that they missed Hamilton. But you may think i being to hasty on the the FIA Ferrari conspiracy but i’m not finished. So it wasnt bad enough that they Stewards seem to have double stanhdards and if you werent sure about the Stewards stand point then the fact that they gave 25 secs to Bourdais for not driving on the grass to make sure massa had a free circuit is a discrace to the sport. Massa and Bourdais were racing for position and Bourdais had the inside line but Massa just drove into him, but for some reason only known to the Cheating Stewards of F1 Bourdais was penialised. Absolute rubbish. I am looking forward to a day when the stewards dont do everything possible for the mighty Ferrari team but i dont think it will every happen. Shame

  • I’m not a driver competing with Lewis so I have no idea if he is ‘dangerous’ but I do know he is aggressive and I have stated that I think that’s fine. Some of the best are aggressive. Lewis is living or dying by his aggression and the sheer fact that he can’t stand to be beat or passed. That’s not unlike some past champions as well.

    In my fans-eye view, Lewis is making mistakes if he is seeking the title but honing his race craft by learning from his mistakes. It is all part of the process. He has much to learn.

    As for the stewards favoritism, I would have been fine with no penalties at all. Let the chips fall as to me, most of these were racing incidents.guarding lines, making contact, that’s just part of the spectacle. In years past these events wouldn’t have been touched. Last years battle between Massa and Kubica at Japan was rife with off-track excursions, touching, banging wheels and made for some exciting racing but there were no penalties involved.

    I am less inclined to say this is Ferrari favoritism as I am to suggest that it is micromanaging the racing to appease many different camps or to create controversy for controversy’s sake. Raise the ire of the viewer and the ratings rise. It would be sad if that were the prime mover but alas, I put nothing past making a dollar in a sport where dollars are eaten with the consuming force of flame to flash paper. Now this seems a tad conspiratorial in nature but I would tend to think that the stewards are overcompensating for the past events of this year and trying to appear fair and consistent.

    I have only seen one angle of the Le Seb/Massa incident and from that angle it is very difficult to tell if Le Seb turned in to Massa or squeezed him. Sure, he says he didn’t but they all say that. Two cars vying for position and arriving at the same place at the same time. I see more similarities in the penalty to Le Seb and the penalty to Massa (for Lewis punt) than I do a Red Car rule.

    Lewis still have 5 points in hand and things are still looking good for him. I am certain he will have taken note of his aggression in T1 and will make amends in Shanghai.

  • christopheroliver

    Hamiltons most dangerous to himself.

  • Srehman

    Short memories, too. Where were the “red car rules” when Schumi was dominating the field and regulation change upon regulation change was foisted upon us in a bid to break his domination.

  • Peter Riva

    Sitting at the Phoenix Airport, pondering what the significance of all I saw early this morning (besides the pathetic coverage and commentary by all, including Machett thinking Kimi was saleep – which is unusual for him) and I think I know WHY Hamilton is the way he is.
    F1 drivers, like fighter pilots (and I have dealt with the best of them), are aggressive, bold, b rave and, at times, do not know where the outside of the envolope is. That’s okay. But the best of the best are highly intelligent. Schumacher was, is, smart. Hill, Clarke, Surtees, Brabham, Fangio, Senna, Lauda – these are smart people. So was, is, Nigel Mansell.
    But Hamilton, for all his talents, is really, really stupid. Anyone who wants a perfect example of his stupidity could look at the 1st corner (championship for him and McClaren) but, better than that, look at the second to last lap for him, Alonso’s last lap. Why, in God’s name would the multi-millionaire, a potential team player for McClaren, a Professional (hah) driver take the risk to himself and Alonso by “unlapping himself.” Watch the video tape, it was aggressive, it was slightly dangerous and it was really really stupid. There, right there, you have an example of his true failing. The man is not all that bright.
    Medium smart drivers come and go. As Massa gains maturity and knowledge (albeit at the hands of Schumacher who’s coaching him – read the Italian press interview with both), he at least does the right thing by his crew. As Kimi battles, yet again, a McClaren damaged car and fnishes in the points, he shows his smarts. All the media’s talk of his boring interviews is mainly based on the stupidity of the questions! See his interviews with the NY Times equivalent in Helsinki… that/s a completely different discussion… load of philosophy, loads to deep thought (not all right, but at least he’s thinking).
    Hamilton, sorry to say, cannot turn talent and ability into smarts. I am afraid he’ll fade from the scene every time thought, not ability, is required.
    Oh, and as for Jason Button allowing LH to fly bvy when he held up Massa.. my guess it’s Button they’ll dump for next year at Honda, not Rubens.
    PS Add 20 points to Kimi for the two times LH bashed Kimi and the championship would lok completely differen. Oh, and add the extra points for today as Kimi was n first lace at the time. My guess is that Kovi was hinted to take Kimi out. Massa’s retaliation was, is, already lauded as the perfect Ferrari response in Italy. There, he’s a hero!

  • benalf

    Well guys, what Kubica, Dennis and Hamilton have said are just opinions. I don’t know what dangerous really means in modern F1 -actually is difficult to get killed inside an F1 nowadays-. I think dangeorus was the move of Webber on Massa, cutting onto his raceline and geting close to the wall at top speed. . . and nothing happened. The problem here is that the limelight is just aiming to Hamilton-Massa fight and from now on every single move might be punished -either way, forget for once the red-rule theory-.

    What happened today was pure, primitive racing and the stewards should have leave the race to take its own shape.

    It amazes me how reckless and half-wit Hamilton is, messing the race just because Raikkonen stole his P1 right before turn 1. It’s suppose he’s racing Massa for the tittle, isn’t he? He almost compromised the whole race, leaving half of the field with no chance to take the turn right -It also amazes me how short-sighted Raikkonen is; it just take a fraction of a second to realize how self-destructive Hamilton was by late-braking and driving straight into Raikkonen path, leaving him with the option to give Massa the race he needed to turn the tables-

    Right, Hamilton is an agressive driver, good for the sport. Is it that bad? Not in my opinion. Bad is to see Hamilton doing over and over and his peers only whining about is driving style. Why don’t they do the same to him? Is it because he’s the “prima donna”? Is it because they are not capable of it?

    It’s good for us to hear what Kubica thinks about it, but no good for the rest of the sport. He should do something about it, like he did with Raikkonen today at Japan putting a serious defensive driving while struggling with graining.

    It think the field in general has been exceptionally nice to Himilton in several occasions while he’s been exceptionally agressive for no reason more than once. Today he did another half-wit move to Alonso unlapping himself for nothing in particular.

    For me, he’s a skilled driver but he needs to learn a lot, the hard way. Otherwise, he will always have the excuse that he’s learning and he’s gonna to become stronger, the same “next time. . . ” kind of phrase.

    A Prost, Schumacher, Alonso could have won 07-08 titles easily with such a gaps in the last races and with the full “support” of the team.

  • mark h

    Benalf,
    You can’t be advocating intentionally crashing into someone? This is a serious business, there are potentially lives at stake.
    Smashing into someone (for whatever reason) strikes me rather as assault than as giving your teammate the opportunity to turn the tables.
    Hamilton deservedly got a drive through for a bonehead move – would you have preferred Kimi to risk injury to Hamilton and to himself so that the situation would have turned out better for Massa?

  • If Kimi had crashed into Hamilton on turn 1 he would have ended his race and probably Masa (following close behind) and Kov. That would have solved nothing. What f1 has going on now is not racing. This is stupidity, Hamilton chose to crash into Kimi instead of Kubica earlier in the year, broke Kimi’s tire in Spa, and cut him and half the field off because he was beaten to the first corner. The reality is Kimi would be leading the Championship if ” Golden ” Boy had not single handedly taken Kimi out of it. Nice to see a great driver win today (Japan) though. Alonso was and still is better than Lewis. But, Lewis has taken the championship from Kimi, I hope Kubica or Massa take it from him. They wanted a Tiger but, Hamilton is no Tiger. Tiger is the best player ever to play his sport. Lewis is not even the best driver right now.

  • benalf

    mark h, you’re kidding, aren’t you? what lives are you talking about? At turn 1 speed?

    Do you mean that if Kimi held his line and kicks Hamilton’s arse could’ve put lifes at risk?

    Do you think Hamilton ran stright on turn 1 just because he was “too fast” and furious to lose his P1 and as a consequence, he doesn’t deserve to be treated the same way? Why other drivers have to deploy the “red carpet” when Hamilton does such things?

    Why is Hamilton -in most of the fans eyes- entitled to ruin someone else’s race and always expect a preferential treatment?

    As Sean Riva highlighted, he ruined Raikkonen’s race at Montreal after making “a good choice”. yesterday he thought he was racing Raikkonen and compromised the whole field at turn 1. Both Maccas hitted Raikkonen, he was literally pushed out of the tarmac. . . but that was a race incident, wasn’t it?

    It is possible that Raikkonen decided to make Hamilton give him his raceline back could have make things worse for Massa. But in the end, Hamilton exited the turn-1-incident in P3 leaving both Ferraris eating the dust -gaining an advantage over them-. Curiously, Hamilton ended in P6 after lap 1 because he ran wide in turn 3 trying to overtake Alonso! -did u see that on tv?, no-. So Hamilton was racing the whole field, his sole intention was to win the race and in doing so, he forgot he should’ve race Massa, Massa only, well if winning the title is what he’s interested in.

  • mark h

    hey benalf,

    What I mean is that intentionally crashing into anybody would be petty, dangerous, unsporting and just plain stupid. Behaviour that is well above someone with the character and integrity of Kimi.

    As for the danger aspect, I am biased on this issue as I have learned the hard way that race tracks and the roads are both very dangerous places, sometimes in the most unlikely circumstances. Knowing the stakes, I have NO RESPECT for anyone who intentionally crashes into people.
    The speed is practically irrelevant, IMO, the principle, however, is paramount.

    When did I ever say that Lewis was in any way in the right? Seriously. He got penalised, I agree with the penalty, and I despair at his stupidity in making the move for I would have liked him to play it safe and get some points.
    As for turn two, it wasn’t on TV, but I am well aware of it and have seen footage. Another stupid move, and I am sad for it.

    Bothe were, like Canada, very stupid moves indeed that showed Hamilton’s inexperience and that I wish hadn’t happened.
    But Hamilton was, like in Canada, punished for his recklessness. And it was not intentional, even if there was a conscious decision about who he hit – which is very difficult to prove indeed.

    So I repeat, what on earth is your problem? It all worked out pretty well, and if Massa hadn’t shown the same foolhardyness as Lewis moments later, then it would have worked out VERY well.
    Surely you wouldn’t have preferred a driver from your own beloved team to have intentionally cheated?
    If so, I can’t understand your definition of fanhood.

  • mark h

    hey benalf, I’m quite serious actually.

    What I mean is that intentionally crashing into anybody would be petty, dangerous, unsporting and just plain stupid. Behaviour like that is well above someone with the character and integrity of Kimi, thankfully.

    As for the danger aspect, I am biased on this issue as I have learned the hard way that race tracks and the roads are both very dangerous places, sometimes in the most unlikely circumstances. Knowing the stakes, I lose a lot of respect for anyone who intentionally crashes into people. (In fact Lewis’ aggressive driving sometimes irritates me, as it clearly does you.)
    The speed is practically irrelevant, IMO, the principle, however, is paramount.

    When did I ever say that Lewis was in any way in the right? Seriously. He got penalised, I agree with the penalty, and I despair at his stupidity in making the move for I would have liked him to play it safe and get some points.
    As for turn two, it wasn’t on TV, but I am well aware of it and have seen footage. Another foolish move, without doubt…

    Both were, like Canada, very stupid moves indeed that showed Hamilton’s inexperience and that I wish hadn’t happened.
    But Hamilton was, like in Canada, punished for his recklessness. And it was not intentional, even if there was a conscious decision about who he hit in Montreal – which is very difficult to prove indeed.

    I just don’t see why you’re so upset. It all worked out pretty well, and if Massa hadn’t shown the same foolhardiness as Lewis moments later, then it would have worked out VERY well for him. But it seems Phil is also a little immature and is struggling with the pressure just now.

    But surely you wouldn’t have preferred a driver from your own beloved team to have intentionally cheated?
    If so, I can’t understand your definition of fanhood.

    Racing, indeed driving, is always dangerous, and crashing intentionally is tantamount to criminal behaviour, in my humble opinion.

  • mark h

    **well BELOW s.o. of Kimi’s character**, rather…

    Say, Benalf,
    I also have been very harsh in my tone there — sorry. It’s a topic I feel rather strongly about.

  • benalf

    I’ve got your point mark h and I am not upset about hamilton’s move or the stewards penalties. At some point I think we missed some very good racing at the front when Hamilton messed it up at turn 1. Massa had a good chance to move up from fifth -racing Hamilton more than once- and obviously Alonso and Kubica had the pace to fight for the lead.

    I am not saying Raikkonen slamming into Hamilton’s car, just keep his position and wait for his reaction. Seb kept his raceline when he exited the pits and I think it was his right, the right thing to do when you’re really racing. In my opinion Raikkonen executed pure defensive driving and gave all the room Hamilton needed. Hamilton, on the other hand, risk it all and left the hard -decision making- to Raikkonen. If you watch Massa’s onboard camera it tells it all, you can even see how Kovalainen executed the same move on Raikkonen and both cars made contact.

    If drivers didn’t take the matter in their own hands, why should the stewards?

  • mark h

    That’s true. It would have been a fascinating race without all the drama, wouldn’t it benalf? Yet we’d probably all talk less about it, funny old world…

    I’ve never been much of a racer (bit of a chicken, really!) but it looked to me like Kimi had to yield because Lewis was completely out of control. Could he have really kept it tight and given Lewis enough of a touch to get him round, so to speak? I know that’s racing, but it looked to me like both were doomed unless Kimi gave way…

  • FFC

    Yes NC, no one is more aware than I am that this is an opinion site! That said, I agree with your position when all is said and done. Aggression, within limits, is fine. Lewis has a lot to learn indeed though, and though some would point to the fact this is only his second season, the newbie argument won’t hold out much longer. If he fails to win the championship this year… Well, how many years did Schumi compete before he won his first championship? I’m loathe to judge him on talent alone. He needs maturity, and that only comes with time.

  • Agreed, FFC. He has plenty of time in my opinion. He is young and is learning that saying your are mentally alert, incisive and determined has worked in the past but at this level, sometimes it just isn’t enough. sometimes you have to be just darned lucky. :)

  • “Lewis has taken the championship from Kimi, I hope Kubica or Massa take it from him. They wanted a Tiger but, Hamilton is no Tiger. Tiger is the best player ever to play his sport. Lewis is not even the best driver right now.”

    I quote my earlier Blog, wondering if anyone had thoughts on the two matters . .

    1) Kimi would be leading championship without at least 3 circumstances of dangerous driving from Hamilton

    2) We are spoon feed Hamilton only to save the sport PR wise. The reality is he has great reaction time and driving skill but, even with all that he still is far from the best driver on the track.

    Also to all those who think Hamilton is still a rookie. Find out how many hours he has spent in simulator and then add it to his time in the car. He is no longer a Rookie.

  • I agree Sean that i do not believe Lewis is the best overall package on the grid. I think that goes to Fernando to be honest. Kimi would be ahead IF…but that’s a difficult position to defend as IF’s aren’t reality. A straw man position it could be argued by Lewis fans.

    Lewis puts butt’s in seats so there is something to that but F1 is losing relevancy through the FIA shortcomings not a lack of talent or charismatic drivers.

  • David

    Hamilton wins in China, the perfect riposte to the wingers and whiners and after proving he is the fastest, will there be more sour grapes?