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If you are a McLaren fan you may want to get out your list of pragmatic moves the team have made in the past to see if you’re going to be excited about the new upgrades for Spain. That’s because driver Jenson Button says he’s approaching the new kit in a pragmatic fashion. We all know pragmatism can often be the mother of all cock ups.

As for the upgrades coming at the Spanish Grand Prix? Buttons told the BBC’s Andrew Benson:

“There’ll be elements that work, elements that perhaps work in a different way than anticipated and elements that don’t work. That’s life.”

Well…I guess it is life. Things get a little more positive and less pragmatic when he discusses the fact that the Spanish Grand Prix takes place at the same track that the teams did two of the three pre-season tests. They have the data from the initial tests and should be able to prove their upgrades with very relevant measurements.

“It’s been difficult for the team to make consistent progress in the first four races,” he said, “but I think returning to a circuit where we undertook two of the pre-season tests will give us a useful benchmark for our progress so far.

“There’s been a lot of talk about the importance of next weekend’s upgrades but, as with every upgrade, they’re simply part of the series of continuous improvements that are made across the season.”

That should make Friday’s free practice session very important for the team so look for sector times and lap times along with projected fuel loads to help you discern if the team has made noticeable progress. I am certain they will and that’s not pragmatism, that just prudence… this is McLaren we’re talking about.

 

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An F1 fan since 1972, NC has spent over 25 years in the technology industry and as a CTO, he focuses on technology integration in commercial workspace design, AV systems integration, digital media strategies, technology planning, consulting, speaking, presenting, sales, content strategy, marketing and brand building.
  • cconf1

    Soooo … there’ll be elements that work, elements that don’t work, and elements that’ll work in 2014.

  • F1Champ

    Are you guys serious? Has Mclaren built the 2013 car spec as a prequel for 2014? If so, what are the things they will be able to test from this seasons car??
    As i understand it will be a totally new design with power train for next year. Enlighten me please…

    • Jack Flash (Aust)

      Settle down champ. Chill.

      The pull-rod front suspension change in geometry and response characteristics in relation to the chassis, the tyres and front down-force transmission, for one….
      Most of the total package for a 2014 F1 car will be totally different, but some elements will carry through from 2013 cars, and this is an important one for McLaren to get on top of. Not only for this season, but for the 2014 car design project as well.

      It took Ferrari all of season 2012 to come to grips with this front suspension format change. McLaren seem to be struggling with its consequences to is 2013 contender as well. 2013 car design will be full of these ‘areas of carry over’ into 2014’s design lineage. A lot will change, but not absolutely everything. Jack Flash.

  • mini696

    Wouldn’t the “elements that perhaps work in a different way than anticipated” also be the “elements that don’t work”. Or are they building in failures these days?