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Just when you were getting excited about the prospects of an American team in Formula 1, the rug has been pulled from under our feet according to Autoweek. It seems the time crunch to get all teh technical partners assembled and the car built is just too much to mount an effective attack on the 2015 season. Haas said:

“It’s already June so it’s just seven months away and the timing issues are starting to get real crazy. We have a list of names [of people we want to hire], but the problem is a lot of times they’re already working for somebody and they can’t get out of their contracts for three to six months so there’s a lot of those contractual issues that have to be resolved before someone can come over.”

So poaching technical staff isn’t easy and getting an engine deal is most likely a big decision too. One still wonders why not buying Caterham F1 isn’t a good idea as they have all the resources to hit the ground running but clearly the value or baggage is not something Haas is interested in.

I know, you’re getting that crummy feeling like all we’ll get is a nose cone and a few t-shirts made and then it implodes but let’s hope that this is prudence working overtime to actually measure twice and cut once. I have faith in the team and the desire and Haas is saying the right things in order to get a proper team fielded for 2016.

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An F1 fan since 1972, NC has spent over 25 years in the technology industry and as a CTO, he focuses on technology integration in commercial workspace design, AV systems integration, digital media strategies, technology planning, consulting, speaking, presenting, sales, content strategy, marketing and brand building.
  • Matt

    Buying Marussia might be a better option as they’re going to be in a state of limbo come end-of-season now that the parent Marussia has disappeared. Plus they should be a dedicated race team rather than a manufacturer.

    Sauber might be better value for money! Or even Toro Rosso as both these mid-pack teams come with performance, engine and driver bonuses.

    • Rick T

      Correct me if I am wrong, but isn’t the marussia f1 team now owned by Marussia Communications Limited operating from Ireland? At least thats what Tracy Novac stated after marussia was absorbed into the russias national infrastructure program. It’s a good thing Hass has taken a whole year to bring a team forward, as we want all the teams to be competitive.
      Otherwise we migh as well introduce a promotion relegation system with gp2.

      • rapierman

        In a sense, don’t you already have that?

  • rapierman

    First thing that just went through my mind: “WHAT!!!??? 2016!!!??? Oh, hell no, you don’t!!!”

  • No surprise there. The F1 teams have long started to work on their 2015 cars and they also have the 2014 cars to build upon. A new team has to start from scratch, so if anything, they need more time. The contractual issues also don’t help. A 2015 start was always unlikely.

  • Michael B

    What do you expect? It takes a while to ship stuff from North Carolina to Australia!

  • I think the potential availability of some existing teams is indeed what may make them unattractive to potential buyers. I would imagine most are saddled with debt or other existing contractual agreements.
    Some are entities essentially for the convenience of, how do I put this tactfully, lets call it: moving money around in ways that could lessen an individual’s tax obligations. Those types of features could make it technically challenging to purchase a team with creative incorporation even if one wanted to.

  • The Imperative Voice

    What would be attractive about buying Marussia or Caterham? Both have struggled financially and between them have several years of effort and to show for that a grand total of 2 championship points courtesy of Bianchi’s Monaco ride just the other day. That suggests the drivers, engineers, physical plant, etc. won’t get you points. Plus if it’s a stock sale you buy their debts too.

    I take the whole point to Haas’ delay to be that they are not going to take shortcuts or be content just to field a team like Marussia or Caterham. They want to take their time and accumulate the quality personnel and physical plant they think they need to be competitive.

    The downsides I see to this are that they will be spending money for another year and three-quarters before they can field any team and start trying to win it back; or that people lose faith in the operation because it has been postponed. A lot of that boils down to Haas’ dedication to this endeavor, including financially.

    I think it might help show their seriousness to potential employees and sponsors if they made some driver and staff hires now or at least by next offseason (and I mean serious names), and maybe line up their engines and such. That would send the message that they are not just playing for time but are acquiring the people and contracts they can, while merely waiting on a few others.

  • Schmorbraten

    I wonder why it took him so long to realize he was way late for 2015?

    If Haas has any success in F1, it will be 2020 at the earliest. But on the bright side of things, maybe the Weehawken circuit will be ready by then.